Invisible Monsters Remix

Invisible Monsters Remix

by Chuck Palahniuk

Review by Patron Cosette Elliott

Are you looking for an adult choose your own adventure? Are you surrounded by people that are changing their gender identity and you’re confused as to why they are undergoing such radical operations? Well, have I got the summer read for you!

I give you Invisible Monsters Remix by Chuck Palahniuk published in 2012. This man knew how to answer our questions way back then. A male author writing from a female protagonist voice that sounds vaguely like a man wearing heels – you don’t have to get that mixed-up sense of gender identity like in Andy Weir’s Artemis published in 2017 – you can gather up your perceptions and question your gender back in 2012.

I recommend you keep a running tally next to you as you read the chapters in this book – make sure you start with the introduction – a guide is provided, but there are chapters that are somehow included that were not part of the read – I think – and have a mirror handy. The interesting part is that Chuck knew our queries and answered them way back in 1999. It wasn’t until later that he was able to publish it in the way he intended it to look. So, if you’d really like to enhance your reading, you can read both – the Remix version and the original Invisible Monsters.

As an added bonus, Invisible Monsters is currently in development for a movie – this way you can read it before you watch it! Imagine that!

Check availability on Invisible Monsters Remix:

Physical book

About the reviewer: Cosette is an average reader who enjoys reading things she shouldn’t. You can often find her picking up more books at the library. You may see her occasionally lost on the Chester Valley Trail.

This review was submitted as part of SummerQuest 2018.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the reviewer and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Tredyffrin Township Libraries.

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