By Scott Turow

Review by Roberta Earle

“Life had taught me a cold truth, that the long-savored dream, when tested by reality, rarely approached expectations.”

Bill ten Boom decides to quit his lucrative job as a partner in a law form, leave his life in the U.S., and take a job with the International Criminal  Court in The Hague.  At 54 years old, he is not sure where his life is going and he is hoping that the ICC, a permanent war crimes tribunal charged with prosecuting crimes against humanity, will help give his life some meaning and purpose.    Continue reading

Camino Island

Camino Island

By John Grisham

Review by Roberta

If you are a John Grisham fan, you may be slightly disappointed in this latest novel.  It does not have quite the drama, pace, and legalese of previous novels.  However, it is a good story and worth reading.

The novel begins with an intricately planned and nearly perfect heist of rare F. Scott Fitzgerald manuscripts from Princeton University by some very clever thieves.   Although the manuscripts are insured for $25 million dollars, the university wants the manuscripts back and the insurance company also prefers this outcome. Continue reading

Orhan’s Inheritance

Orhan’s Inheritance

By: Aline Ohanesian

Review by: Shahnaz

Tragic human stories of greed under different titles of religion, land, country, resources, and freedom happen every day. This is one of them, which takes place in two time periods, 75 years apart and across two continents, old and new. We all have heard about the tragic Armenian death walks from Turkey’s northern region to the Syrian desert, under the label of displacements. Just looking at the map gives one a dizzying feeling, let alone walking it, in hard, hot weather, with no food or comforting rest, mostly women and children who were guided by violent guards. We all have read about it, but what I found in this new book is looking on this tragedy from a different angle – human common emotions of love, hate, power, and suffering. Continue reading

One Day

One Day

By: David Nicholls

Review by Stephanie Crean

When I received this book as a “blind choice” as part of TPL’s ‘Christmas in July’, I expected it to be a cute, brainless beach read. One Day chronicles the relationship between two people by visiting them on the same day, year after year. Dexter, an affluent, self assured individual struggles with womanizing, drugs, alcohol, and eventually, self esteem. He constantly relies on the kindness and support of Emma, who wishes she could have the Dexter she met in college. Continue reading

No One Cares About Crazy People

No One Cares About Crazy PeopleNo One Cares About Crazy People

By: Ron Powers

Review by: Maria Salvucci

This book chronicles the lives of the author and his family whose two sons were diagnosed with schizophrenia. The author intersperses his family story with the history of mental health treatment in the US. It’s an eye opening look at how mentally ill people have been treated in harsh, cruel and ineffective ways throughout time due to the lack of compassion and understanding of mental illness. The author and his wife experienced this while trying to get help for their sons. It is obvious they are a family of means so could afford better care than the average American and it was still difficult to find. Continue reading

Empires of Light

Empires of LightEmpires of Light

By: Jill Jonnes

Review by Sarah Reisert

It’s one of the most epic scientific rivalries of the ages: Nikola Tesla, the dreamer, the willowy eccentric, purveyor of alternating current, vs. Thomas Edison, keen-eyed inventor, ambition personified, defender of direct current. They’d lead the world from a time of sizzling, blinding arc lights into the modern world of glowing filaments—but at what cost to themselves? Tesla gave up his patents to George Westinghouse so the world could have his inventions, leaving him poor and forgotten. Edison turned his genius to vile ends, electrocuting prisoners to “prove” AC’s danger. Continue reading

A Gentleman in Moscow

A Gentleman in MoscowA Gentleman in Moscow

By Amor Towels

Review by Shahnaz

This book is a very delightful, cosmopolitan oriented story, which is well-researched and written by an artful author. The main character of the book observes the changes in the history of the Russian revolution, the adaptation of its people and politics to the new rules as well as changes in his own circumstances by being confined to one building (having a room in a hotel with no permission to get out). Continue reading

Lean, Long, and Strong

Lean Long and StrongLean, Long, and Strong: The 6-Week Strength-Training, Fat-Burning Program for Women

By Wini Linguvic

Review by Roberta Earle

Recently I was given a copy of the book, Younger Next Year, which I dutifully read and decided to implement the recommendations for a comprehensive exercise program which has 2 main components – cardio and strength.   Since I have the cardio covered, I needed to add strength training. Continue reading

Lilac Girls

Lilac Girls

By Martha Kelly

Review by Susan Peterman

I discovered Lilac Girls while browsing in Wellington Bookstore. I had ancestors who survived the Holocaust, but did not communicate their stories and others who did not have an opportunity to tell their stories. I was interested in this historical novel of three heroic women whose stories converged following the war’s end. New York Socialite Caroline Ferriday, a former actress, assists a charity to rescue French orphans, Kasia, a Polish teenager who, unbeknownst to her, begins serving the resistance, and Herta, an ambitious surgeon, find themselves at opposite ends of history once Poland is invaded. The story is structured as separate narratives until their post-war activities bring them into contact with one another. The story is gripping and at times, horrifying. Continue reading