Delicious

DeliciousDelicious

by Sherry Thomas

Review by Michele Bolay

Delicious is one of the best-written historical romances that I have ever read, and I read a LOT of them. Thomas has such a talent with plot, SETTING, language, and characterization. Her stories and her characters are complex and compelling, and the late Victorian setting is a nice change from the Regency period, and offers up so many more possibilities for the female characters.

I rarely give 5-star reviews, but I could not put this one down and I know I will remember it long after. I do agree with some reviewers who said that the ending was a bit too tidy, but it’s a minor quibble. This IS still formula fiction, after all. So glad I have discovered Sherry Thomas!

Check availability on Delicious

About the reviewer: Michele Bolay has worked at the library for more than 25 years. She loves art, romance literature & working with community theatre. Visit her in our children’s department!

Woman of God

Woman of God

by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro

Review By Angie Andre

Commuting can be a long and tiresome experience but listening to audio books makes the long drive more enjoyable.  I have always enjoyed James Patterson so I happily checked out Woman of God with the expectation that it would be an entertaining listen. It ended up being much, much more. Continue reading

Raven Boys

The Raven BoysThe Raven Boys

By Maggie Stiefvater

Review by Zoey Mills

The Raven Cycle follows a group of soon-to-graduate prep school boys and Blue, a clairvoyant’s daughter, and their quest to find the grave of the Welsh King, Glendower. Lead by Gansey, the group is certainly dynamic in that each character brings something to the story. I would say one of Stiefvater’s main strengths is building characters.

As I got further into The Raven Boys, I realized that I became invested in characters (some more than others) and I could picture them as real people. Building entirely different worlds in a book is an extremely difficult thing to do, and often authors tend to give their readers an information overload. Stiefvater is extremely subtle in providing the information needed, and her foreshadowing is so subtle to the point where I had no idea of any of the twists that lay ahead. Although some events within the story are definitely fantastical, her writing is so moving and powerful that you can find yourself lost in the world of Henrietta, Virginia. Continue reading

Templar

Templar

by Jordan Mechner, LeUyen Pham, and Alex Puvilland

Review by Travis Johnson

Dungeons, swordfighting, unjust imprisonment, evil viziers, love interests in towers, spectacular jumping ability: these are the things that Templar and Jordan Mechner’s groundbreaking 1989 computer game Prince of Persia have in common. However, if you were unaware of Mechner’s subsequent work in various mediums, you might be forgiven for finding it hard to believe that this is the work of someone who achieved their initial fame as a game programmer. Continue reading

Justin Morgan Had a Horse

Justin Morgan Had a HorseJustin Morgan Had a Horse

by Marguerite Henry

Review by Rachel Shuman

This is a wonderful book for a child interested in early American history. In telling the story of Joel Goss, the author shows what life was like for a boy growing up just after the Revolutionary War. The reader follows Joel as he spends the last summer of his childhood journeying with music teacher Justin Morgan. Upon their return home to Vermont, Joel is apprenticed out to a local miller. As he learns his trade and becomes a young man, his path often crosses that of Li’l Bub, a colt belonging to the music teacher, and the eventual founding stallion of America’s oldest horse breed. Their reunion, and the empathy Joel feels in regard to the aged horse, is deeply moving. Continue reading

Bhagavad Gita

Bhagavad Gita: A New Translation

Tranlated by: Gavin Flood and Charles Martin

Reviewed by Sarah Newell

Imagine you are on the precipice of a great battle.  You are an ancient warrior lined up with your faction facing the opposing army.  As each side prepares for battle you realize what a great loss this will be for both armies.  With two sides of a great family facing each other cousins will fight cousins, uncles will slay uncles, and neighbors will maim neighbors.  Continue reading

Public Library & Other Stories

Public Library and Other StoriesPublic Library and Other Stories

by Ali Smith

Review by Krystal Mainhart

This book contains a variety of short stories which all, in one way or another, relate around the theme of books and libraries, and how both of these impact the individual as well as communities.  This book became part of, “a fierce fight, a growing national movement …to defend our public libraries [in the United Kingdom].”  In the North American edition, the stories are interspersed with brief sections of transcribed interviews- the author asked friends and strangers about their views of libraries, their histories, and recent library closures.  Continue reading

Founding Brothers

Founding BrothersFounding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation

by Joseph J. Ellis

Review by Angela DeMott 

Joseph Ellis’ Founding Brothers has a lot to say about the Revolutionary era. In addition, it is a commentary on our current political, economic, and social situation. By way of analyzing six significant moments in U.S. history, Ellis argues that there were as many, if not more, interpretations of the revolutionary spirit of 1776 (and what that actually entailed for the growing nation) as there are beliefs on what it means to be an American today; Ellis also argues that our first political leaders didn’t really know what they were doing (How could they have? There was no precedent!) yet their gut instincts and passion still lead us, eventually, to green pastures.  Continue reading

Oliver Twist

Oliver Twist

By Charles Dickens

Review by Indumathi Rathakrishnan

The story revolves around Oliver who was born in unappreciable circumstances. Young ones are the most affected by the violence in the society which is well quoted in the story. I found characters in the story well built. Continue reading

The Explorer’s Guild Volume One

The Explorer's Guild Volume OneThe Explorer’s Guild, Vol. I: A Passage to Shambhala

By Jon Baird & Kevin Costner, with illustrations by Rick Ross

Review by Sarah Reisert

A wealthy member of the Explorer’s Guild accepts a challenge to find the Northwest Passage, but on the way he stumbles across a figure of legend: the city of Shambhala. He escapes with his life but falls terribly ill, and enlists his brother (and the rough-and-tumble regiment his brother commands) to help him figure out where on Earth the city will appear next. At least, I think that’s the story. Continue reading