Literary Detectives Puzzle

Word Puzzle Wednesday

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Paoli Central

You might think that the name “Paoli” was chosen for a little Main Line town purely to separate the locals (who know how to pronounce it) from the out-of-towners (who don’t). But this week Paoli welcomed some out-of-towners who knew exactly how to pronounce “Paoli,” because they came from the birthplace of General Pasquale Paoli, the Mediterranean island of Corsica. Among the visitors, here to continue a long-standing relationship between the Paoli Business and Professional Association and the territorial government of Corsica, was Gilles Simeoni, President of the Corsican Assembly, along with the Corsican Minister of Culture and the Minister of Tourism.

Pasquale Paoli is Corsica’s national hero and second-most-famous native son—after Napoleon Bonaparte. Paoli was a freedom fighter who helped win the island’s independence from the Republic of Genoa and served as president of the Corsican Republic during its brief existence from 1755 to 1769. He was also the author of the republic’s constitution, considered to be the first ever democratic constitution, based on Enlightenment principles. Although Paoli never visited America, he was an inspiration to the American revolutionaries, and so much admired in this area that an inn was named after him—and the town was named after the inn.

On Friday, April 6, the delegation stopped by Paoli Library to view the large bust of Paoli and a replica of his ceremonial sword given to the town in 1966 by the mayor of Morosaglia, Paoli’s birthplace. In the absence of a town hall or a community center, Paoli Library serves as the center of town, so it has housed these mementos ever since.

President Simeoni and his compatriots extended a heartfelt invitation to the residents of Paoli to visit the island of Corsica, to enjoy the crystal-clear waters and sandy beaches of the coastline, and the pristine creeks and granite cliffs farther inland.

Paoli Library—although it can offer no beaches or cliffs–also extends a heartfelt invitation to area residents, to come view the statue of General Paoli and to get acquainted with the many unexpected free resources it does offer, from e-books, to museum passes, to a GoPro camera. The library is right in the center of Paoli, in the Wells Fargo building at the corner of Route 30 and Darby Road.

l-r: Nanette Maupertuis, Foreign Minister; Gilles Simeoni, President of the Corsican Assembly; Josepha Giacommeti, Minister of Culture; Hyacinthe Vanni, Vice President of the Corsican Assembly; Catherine Sorba, documentary film director; Francis Beretti, past chair, University of Corsica English Department.

Pretty Girls

Pretty GirlsPretty Girls

by Karin Slaughter

Review by Jonathan Trice

 

I spend a lot of time in my car an audio books are one of my favorite ways to ease the monotony of my drive.  When looking for something new Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter was suggested for me.  This was an author I knew nothing about and a genre that I don’t spend much time reading and I was glad that I took a chance on this book.  Continue reading

A Canticle for Leibowitz

A Canticle for Leibowitz

by Walter M. Miller, Jr.

Review by Sarah Reisert

In Miller’s version of the future, humanity practically destroyed itself with the advent of nuclear weapons in the twentieth century.  This book is comprised of three separate jumps in time (each about six hundred years apart, starting about six hundred years from the nuclear holocaust) in the company of the Albertian Order of Leibowitz, brothers in the southwestern United States devoted to preserving knowledge in a world that now doesn’t trust it.

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The World of Edena

The World of EdenaThe World of Edena

by Moebius

reviewed by Travis Johnson

 

Two spaceship repairmen get whisked off to the seemingly idyllic garden planet of Edena, in this vividly illustrated comic-book epic by French artist Moebius. In the copious notes to this book, the artist explains that he had to resist the urge to make his illustrations too “cluttered.”

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City of Brick and Shadow

City of Brick and Shadow

by Tim Wirkus

Review by Angela DeMott

 

City of Brick and Shadow is original, thoughtful, funny, and asks more questions than it attempts to answer. I loved how Tim Wirkus throws the reader into the Mormon missionaries’ world without much explanation – you pick up on the vocabulary and norms of their lifestyle by osmosis and it’s a different and fascinating approach to a somewhat unfamiliar landscape. Continue reading

The Marriage Lie

The Marriage LieThe Marriage Lie

by Kimberly Belle

Review by Kathy Gallagher

 

The Marriage Lie is a mysterious love story, an intriguing page turner that kept me on my toes trying to figure out what was going on.

Will and his wife Iris are so in love. Trying to, in fact, have a child together. He leaves on a business trip the morning after attempting conception. Iris is a school teacher. While at work she hears of a plane that has crashed en route to Seattle. She thinks nothing of it until she is contacted by the airline. Iris is told that Will was one of the fatalities. Impossible, she thinks, as Will was on a business trip to Orlando. The mystery begins: is the dead man truly her husband? Is it a mistake? Continue reading

Books to Movies 2018

Books to read before they hit the big screen in 2018

Forever My Girl Book Cover

 

Forever My Girl by Heidi McLaughlin

Film adaptation expected January 19


 

Horse Soldiers by Doug Stanton

Film adaptation titled 12 Horses expected January 19


monster

 

Monster by Walter Dean Myers

Film adaptation premiering at the Sundance Film Festival January 22

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The Highwayman

The Highwayman

By Kerrigan Byrne

Review by Kate Boyle

When reading a historical romance novel, one usually knows what to expect . . . beautiful people getting together and dealing with a little bit of drama, usually dealing with class or birth. Kerrigan Byrne blows those expectations clear out of the water with the first novel in the Victorian Rebels series. Dangerous and deeply disturbed, Dorian Blackwell’s reputation precedes him. Farah Mackenzie spends her days working as a clerk for Scotland Yard, around some of the most depraved men of London. They don’t know each other . . . or do they? Continue reading

The Quality of Silence

The Quality of Silence

by Rosamund Lupton

Review by Angie Andre

In a freezing remote part of Alaska astrophysicist, Yasmin and her 10 year old deaf daughter, Ruby are on a mission. Despite betrayal, fear, and deathly cold weather Yasmin is determined to find her husband, Matt. There has been terrible accident and an entire village in Northern Alaska has been obliterated. Yasmin and Ruby brave the tundra in search of their missing Matt. As they encounter darkness they realize someone is trying to stop them from finding Matt and learning the truth. Continue reading